The end of SIP Trunking?

2025 is the date many of us are talking about. The notional end of ISDN, as we know it.

Many people are assuming that we’ll end up with SIP Trunking replacing ISDN on a like-for-like basis, but we’re not talking about the elephant in the room (or the basement). The ageing PBX that was always one of the biggest pieces of technical debt that so many businesses are still stuck with.

To some, our love affair with SIP Trunking has been a “will they, won’t they” kind of deal. Always poised to take over from ISDN, but never quite reaching the dizzying heights of TDM popularity. Does that mean that the world is full of Luddites?

No. Far from it.

As an industry I don’t think we give our customers the credit for their desire to innovate.

Businesses are taking innovation into their own hands where their service provider can’t keep up. They’re sourcing their own cloud-based services to replace traditional ICT. Office 365, Skype, Fuze, Slack, Webex; they’re all available to consume in a self-service model and many businesses are now serving themselves.

There is a place for SIP Trunking, but it’s not going to be replacing ISDN when 2025 comes around. Cloud UC and Mobility app providers will see to that and services providers have a choice to either join the party or sit on the outskirts fighting over the scraps.

This doesn’t mean that SIP Trunking is irrelevant. Providers like Twilio are leading the way in providing a rich, extensible developer environment to encourage creativity and combine SIP Trunking services with useful APIs to provision and control in high volumes. This feature-rich modern platform allows our current generation of application developers to build better (and simpler) Cloud-based UC services without having to emulate traditional ISDN with SIP Trunking direct to the user’s legacy PBX.

We should be asking an additional question in the run up to 2025.

Will SIP Trunking die before ISDN breathes its last?

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